9 Super-Successful People Share Exactly What They Do Before Bed

Christina Heiser June 27, 2017 You Should Know

When you spend all day running around, it makes sense that you’d feel like collapsing on top of your bed without even brushing your teeth or changing into your PJs. But a pre-bedtime routine can set you up for a good night’s sleep, as well as a great day tomorrow. Here, nine super-successful people in the wellness space, who work truly hard for a living, share the top habits they engage in before hitting the sheets.

They Make To-Do Lists

“Every night, I take inventory of what I accomplished that day and create my to-do list for the next day. By reflecting on my accomplishments, I’m able to end my day with gratitude and ‘close the day.’ And by preparing for the next day, my mornings are less chaotic. I can sleep easier knowing I have a plan and structure for the next day.” Allison Tibbs, personal trainer and healthy lifestyle coach in San Francisco

They Wash Away Stress

“I never go to sleep without showering. The warm water relaxes me and of course I feel clean going into bed.” Jonathan Alpert, New York-based psychotherapist and author of Be Fearless: Change Your Life in 28 Days

They Shut Off Their Phones

“I like to take at least a half hour—ideally 45 minutes—to wind down from the day before getting into bed. I start by retiring from texts, emails, and social media for the day. Having time to clear that out of my head prevents me from lying awake with my mind churning over work or social obligations.” – Rebecca Weible, founder of Yo Yoga! In New York City

They Cuddle with Their Pets

“Our office cat, Shadow, is with me most of the time, so five to 10 minutes before bed is our hangout time. I usually spend it grooming him (he really loves to be brushed!), telling him how my day was, and giving him tummy rubs.” – Alexis Chateau, travel blogger and founder of Alexis Chateau PR, a lifestyle PR agency in Atlanta

They Set Themselves Up to Chill

“About 45-60 minutes before bed, I try to create an environment that is relaxing. I close the blinds, shut down most of the lights, and do my best to power down the phone and computer.” – Alpert

They Make Getting into Bed a Priority

“When I’m at my studio until 9 or 10 p.m., my bedtime routine can be a little more forceful in the interest of time. I definitely keep an eye on the time, and I set an actual ‘goal time’ to get to bed by.” – Jillian Dreusike, founder of Allongée, a ballet cardio studio in Philadelphia

They Curl Up with a Good Novel

“I set my phone to ‘Do Not Disturb’ and pick up whatever fiction book I happen to be in the middle of reading. I opt specifically for fiction because—at least for me—it allows for my higher thinking centers to shut down.” Greg Ux, certified strength and conditioning coach and trainer at Barry’s Boot Camp in Boston

They Update Their Journal

“Every night, I write in the journal I’ve kept since starting Thrive Causemetics two years ago. When you’re building a business, it moves at lightening speed, and journaling helps me process the today and remember tomorrow.” – Karissa Bodnar, founder of Thrive Causemetics, which donates products to women with cancer

They Think Positive

“Mentally, in an effort to reset my mind and go to sleep stress-free, I try to think of a few positive things from my day—it might be as simple as a good cup of coffee or meal—and also think about something positive I look forward to the next day.” – Alpert

They Work Their Muscles Down Below

“I put away my phone and read a few pages of a novel. It helps shut off my mind. Lately, I’ve also been working on building my pelvic floor muscles with my Elvie.” – Sadie Kuzban, founder of 305 Fitness in New York City

They Follow the Same Routine Each Night

“I try to keep my pre-bedtime routine as consistent as possible, and it always includes reading—from a book—for at least 30 minutes, switching my phone to ‘Do Not Disturb,’ and making sure to keep the lights low for at least an hour. A few other things I tend to throw in the mix are a light snack, catching up on a podcast episode, and taking melatonin. It’s tough—if not impossible—to do all of these every night, but I find it’s worth it to stay as vigilant as possible and try to stay the course.” – Keith Cushner, founder and general manager of Tuck, an organization that provides sleep education to consumers

 

We want to know! What’s your pre-bedtime routine?

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